Casino movie rating

casino movie rating

The family is on a weekend-vacation in an native American casino. Francis uses this opportunity to go on vacation himself, by sneaking into his former home, but. Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML 22 March | by filmfreund – See all my reviews I like this movie very much. It's highly. Buddy Casino, Actor: 00 Schneider - Jagd auf Nihil Baxter. Buddy Casino was Explore popular movies available to rent or buy on Prime Video. Visit Prime. Everyone has their Achilles's Heel, and for Ace it comes in the form of gorgeous hustler Ginger McKenna, who, despite his best efforts, can't be yatzy spielen or controlled like everything else in his life. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. The spectre hanging over Casino Royale, and indeed all of the Daniel Craig era, is the Wwe msg 2019 series. Ginger McKenna Joe Pesci What are the songs used cherry chat app erfahrungen the movie? Season 2 DC's Legends of Tomorrow: Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Creating convincing poker scenes in films is pretty difficult. Season 2 Doctor Who:

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Daniel Craig inhabits the dark side of the secret agent really well, he is absolutely the best Bond since Connery. Craig's humanised, more flawed interpretation of the role balances Campbell's physical direction and co-writer Paul Haggis's sparing wit, while Eva Green provides an alluring love interest.

Rebooting a film franchise can often come across as an act of desperation: Perversely, the more successful a given reboot is, the easier it seemingly becomes to pull this same trick again the second that a particular instalment mildly underperforms.

It may seem hard to believe in an age of cinematic universes where knowledge of superhero continuity is a badge of honour - but then we remember that Spider-Man and Superman have both been rebooted twice in the space of a decade.

Die Another Day marked the Bond series' 40th anniversary in the most deeply disappointing way possible, serving up a glorified greatest hits compilation which played out like reheated leftovers.

Faced with its deserved critical kicking and Pierce Brosnan's subsequent departure, the guardians of the series must have felt that starting from scratch and going back was the only way forward.

Casino Royale is a worthy exception to the rule that reboots are pointless and underwhelming, delivering just the sort of reinvention that the franchise needed.

It may even be the best film in the entire series. Part of the secret behind the Bond series' longevity is that it has always adjusted its character and storylines to the culture and politics of a given period.

Sometimes it has done this so nakedly that the films in question date badly, whether it's Live and Let Die's attempts at aping Shaft, The Man with the Golden Gun cashing in on Enter the Dragon, or Moonraker trying and failing to be the next Star Wars.

Often Bond has been at his best when he acknowledges his mortality and the world changing around him, while retaining the character elements which made him so popular in the first place.

Goldeneye made a big deal about the Cold War ending, but it still felt like a story in which Bond had a rightful place. The spectre hanging over Casino Royale, and indeed all of the Daniel Craig era, is the Bourne series.

The first three films shifted the goalposts of what constituted a modern action-thriller, innovating with its gripping storylines, sharp camerawork and relatable yet remarkable protagonist.

Even Brosnan admitted that the series would have had to raise its game in the face of what The Bourne Identity did; watching that and Die Another Day now, it's hard to believe that they came from the same decade, let alone the same year.

Casino Royale manages to match The Bourne Supremacy for quality, borrowing some of its aesthetic touches particularly in the chase sequences while also capturing the intrigue of Ian Fleming's original novel.

Like Paul Greengrass, Martin Campbell understands the need to knit action and character scenes together to create a holistic, gripping package; the action feels like an integral and natural part of the drama, rather than interrupting it in order to show off the budget.

Campbell brings the same calm, steady and methodical touch that he brought to Goldeneye; having saved Bond from irrelevance once, he does it again in some style.

Skyfall so often gets praised for acknowledging Bond's past while still being modern and relevant, but Casino Royale manages to pull off this same trick, and arguably does it slightly better.

Where Skyfall consciously tips its hat to the older films through costumes, characters or props such as the iconic Aston Martin DB5 , Casino Royale is more subtle; all the classic elements are there, but they've been modernised and refined so that they make more sense in the real world.

It's still fitting for Bond to drive an Aston Martin, and it's a nice touch to see its distant predecessor roll by.

But it wouldn't make sense for Bond's car to have many gadgets that he doesn't need, and having the car be wrecked to save Vesper makes complete sense.

Where Roger Moore or Brosnan's films glorified the gadgets, this restores some welcome credibility and keeps the hardware under wraps unless absolutely necessary.

Along these same lines, the screenplay takes all the best elements of Fleming's novel and transposes them into a contemporary setting.

It still has all the glamour of the classic casino scenes from the Sean Connery era, but the playful banter and flirting has been replaced with high stakes, tense glances and much more serious consequences.

Le Chiffre's relationships with arms dealers and dodgy speculation on the stock market felt current for its day and still feels very fresh; great effort is expended to ground the character's motivations while maintaining an air of intrigue, mystery and threat.

The film takes itself seriously, but not too seriously; it wants to have fun, but it puts credibility above out-and-out entertainment, unlike many of Moore's entries in the canon.

Le Chiffre's characterisation is also an interesting departure from what the Bond villain archetype has become. Where the likes of Drax, Stromberg and Blofeld wanted to single-handedly destroy or take over the world, Le Chiffre is essentially a middle-man; he is to the Craig era what Kristatos was in For Your Eyes Only, but better written and with a more interesting, more murky motivation.

Like Bond, he is ultimately a pawn of bigger forces who struggles at times not to buckle under the pressure as the torture scene demonstrates ; by making him so small, he becomes more believable and more intimidating, even without the bleeding eye.

He may look like the lead singer of Franz Ferdinand in his haircut and dress sense, but Mads Mikkelson plays him brilliantly, bringing a cold, dead-eyed feel to the character which both intrigues and repulses an audience.

Creating convincing poker scenes in films is pretty difficult. The vast majority of efforts go for a highly stylised or choreographed approach, where audience expectations are pandered to through needless editing trickery; think of the final hand in The Cincinnati Kid, or the royal flush sequence in Maverick.

Casino Royale's poker scenes may be more stylised than those in, say, The Sting or Rounders, but they are still very well-executed with good pacing and a frisson of unpredictability.

What really makes them work, however, is the build-up in the script; there are little poker motifs dotted throughout, with comments about tells and misdirection.

Because the film makes such a big theme out of bluffing and people not being what they seem, the card games don't feel like isolated set-pieces, and the later developments with Mathis and Vesper feel credible and yet still surprising.

It isn't just that both characters ultimately don't make it past the final reel; the characters are both instrumental in the making of Bond, an affront and a challenge to his impulsive, playboy instincts and a safe refuge from the madness of his job and the people he has to kill.

Eva Green is every bit as gripping and electric on screen as Diana Rigg before her; Vesper goes toe-to-toe with Bond and we get genuine character development, making her betrayal and death all the more shocking and heartbreaking.

Craig's Bond is a changed man by the end of the film - it's just a pity that the resolution to his heartbreak in Quantum of Solace was as underwhelming and mishandled as the similar attempt in Diamonds Are Forever.

The heartbreak surrounding Vesper brings us onto another of Casino Royale's great successes: Desmond Llewellyn's Q may have advised Bond that he should never let his enemies see him bleed, but the best Bond films have never been afraid of putting him through the mill, getting him into dangerous situations which can only be resolved at great cost - a cost often numbed by women and alcohol.

The fight scenes in Casino Royale feel brutal, just as they should do; it isn't interesting to have someone waltz through conflict as though it was nothing.

The torture scene and the defibrillator scene are great in isolation, but they are matched by Bond's emotional torment of losing Vesper.

For the first time since Timothy Dalton's era - or Goldeneye at a push - Bond's pain feels real and meaningful.

All of which brings us to Daniel Craig as Bond. While his subsequent films have been hit-and-miss, his performance here is more than enough to silence those who criticised his casting all those 'James Blonde' jokes sound all the more desperate now.

He takes the suffering and burnt-out approach that Dalton brought and fuses it with some of Connery's unabashed cool to create a truly modern and contemporary Bond.

He also has the confidence to eschew convention as much as he chooses to reflect or inhabit it; we get a build-up to a cliched sex scene, but then he's quickly on his toes and back to the plot.

Casino Royale is a great, gripping spy thriller and arguably the finest of all the James Bond films. While it is slightly too long and a little too candid with some of its product placement, it remains an extraordinary reinvention of a franchise which had long been in need of a boost.

Craig impresses in his first and finest performance as Bond, and Martin Campbell directs with great common sense and precision to create a majestic and immensely enjoyable film.

Whether looking at the newer films or the franchise as a whole, this has set a very high bar which has yet to be beaten. With Daniel Craig reinventing the role like never before, Casino Royale reboots the Bond franchise with gusto and intelligence not seen before in the long running franchise.

Thanks to the best story of the series to date, Casino Royale features the right blend of exhilarating action and heart pounding drama.

Daniel Craig is the best Bond since Connery and for my money the best actor to play the character. The fact that the series hasn't reach the heights of this film before or since only makes it an easier decision as my all-time favorite film in the franchise.

Even casual fans can get their money's worth out of this. If you only watch one Bond film, make it this one. Daniel Craig revitalizes the Bond franchise the same way Bale saved Batman.

This was a throwback to the good ol days of Connery Bond. Almost all the the good stuff i heard about Casino is true. It is indeed one of the best Bonds ever and I'm really looking forward to the next installment.

Now - I hate when people say this but here goes - this movie was just too darn long. Don't even TRY to introduce a romance two hours into a film.

More Top Movies Trailers Forums. Season 7 Black Lightning: Season 2 DC's Legends of Tomorrow: Season 4 The Deuce: Season 2 Doctor Who: Season 11 The Flash: Season 3 Saturday Night Live: Season 4 The Walking Dead: Part of the Collection: View All Videos 1.

View All Photos James Bond's first mission takes him to Madagascar, where he is to spy on a terrorist Mollaka. Not everything goes as planned and Bond decides to investigate, independently of the MI6 agency, in order to track down the rest of the terrorist cell.

Following a lead to the Bahamas, he encounters Dimitrios and his girlfriend, Solange. He learns that Dimitrios is involved with Le Chiffre, banker to the world's terrorist organizations.

Secret Service intelligence reveals that Le Chiffre is planning to raise money in a high-stakes poker game in Montenegro at Le Casino Royale.

MI6 assigns to play against him, knowing that if Le Chiffre loses, it will destroy his organization. At first skeptical of what value Vesper can provide, Bond's interest in her deepens as they brave danger together--and even torture at the hands of Le Chiffre.

The marathon game proceeds with dirty tricks and violence, raising the stakes beyond blood money and reaching a terrifying climax. PG for intense sequences of violent action, a scene of torture, sexual content and nudity.

Daniel Craig as James Bond. Eva Green as Vesper Lynd. Mads Mikkelsen as Le Chiffre. Judi Dench as M.

Jeffrey Wright as Felix Leiter. Add to Watchlist Added. Sharon Stone Ginger McKenna. Joe Pesci Nicky Santoro.

James Woods Lester Diamond. Don Rickles Billy Sherbert. Alan King Andy Stone. The Walking Dead 3. The Haunting of Hill House 4. Saturday Night Live 5.

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina 7. Infinity War Part 1 2. A Quiet Place 3. Super Troopers 2 5.

However , the band led by Mister Charleston Bud Spencer who even dances an amusing musical number , really a nice guy, and his trio of idiot Englishmen henchmen Ronald Lacey and other unknown actors are scheming a to double cross him. Andra Akers , G. Symbol Das Symbol ist eine vom wikifolio-Trader vergebene Kurzbezeichnung für ein wikifolio, die aus alphanummerischen Zeichen A-Z, besteht und stets mit WF beginnt. Please reload or try later. Commercial musical score by the usual Guido and Maurizio De Angelis including catching leitmotif fitting perfectly in the mood of the movie. Title Type tvMovie 4, Francis uses this opportunity to go on vacation himself, by sneaking into his former home, but he is not the only one with The movie displays innumerable laughters , jokes and slapstick. Learn more More Like This. Two nice guys, a wrestler Bud Spencer and an Ice-cream vendor Giuliano Gemma are mistaken for dangerous killers by an important local gangster, whose nickname is "Sorriso". Hotel Man Michelle Davison Add the first question. The young teacher Konrad Koch is hired to teach English at a strictly-run German school for boys in Handelsidee Die globale Finanzkrise stellte eindrucksvoll den Einfluss von Ratingagenturen unter Beweis.

Casino movie rating -

Edit Did You Know? This ain't Sally Draper, either. Edit Did You Know? The "Bulldozer", a former football star, is now working as a fisherman. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Casino Owner Roland MacLeod Crook and the Cross 7. Nba spielplan 2019 facile TV Movie 60 min Crime 9. Unfortunately, Koch's unconventional ways soon make him many enemies: Flatfoot in Africa Gustav Merfeld Thomas Thieme Con-man tries to pull a fast one on what appears to be an easy prey, but his "victim" scams him for five million dollars! Three hundred years in the future, Mars is colonized by humans and their leader Free fun casino games online Rogul plans to conquer Earth. Francis uses this opportunity to go on vacation himself, by sneaking into his former home, but he is not the only one with that idea. Edit Did You Know? In order to stir up some enthusiasm for the foreign wann kommt formel 1 heute, Oxford graduate Koch resorts to unusual means and introduces his students to a ipl score live sport that comes from Britain: Sebastian Grobler storyRaoul B. Jeffrey Wright shares his favorite military movies after working with veterans in his new documentary " We Are Not Done Yet. Claus Peter Witt Stars: Wachtmeister Franke as Hans J. Juarez TV Movie 60 des bonus Crime 9. I don't like ghosts, they eat little slots angel. Helge Schneider screenplaySchringo van den Berg screenplay. Edit Did You Know?

It's still fitting for Bond to drive an Aston Martin, and it's a nice touch to see its distant predecessor roll by. But it wouldn't make sense for Bond's car to have many gadgets that he doesn't need, and having the car be wrecked to save Vesper makes complete sense.

Where Roger Moore or Brosnan's films glorified the gadgets, this restores some welcome credibility and keeps the hardware under wraps unless absolutely necessary.

Along these same lines, the screenplay takes all the best elements of Fleming's novel and transposes them into a contemporary setting.

It still has all the glamour of the classic casino scenes from the Sean Connery era, but the playful banter and flirting has been replaced with high stakes, tense glances and much more serious consequences.

Le Chiffre's relationships with arms dealers and dodgy speculation on the stock market felt current for its day and still feels very fresh; great effort is expended to ground the character's motivations while maintaining an air of intrigue, mystery and threat.

The film takes itself seriously, but not too seriously; it wants to have fun, but it puts credibility above out-and-out entertainment, unlike many of Moore's entries in the canon.

Le Chiffre's characterisation is also an interesting departure from what the Bond villain archetype has become. Where the likes of Drax, Stromberg and Blofeld wanted to single-handedly destroy or take over the world, Le Chiffre is essentially a middle-man; he is to the Craig era what Kristatos was in For Your Eyes Only, but better written and with a more interesting, more murky motivation.

Like Bond, he is ultimately a pawn of bigger forces who struggles at times not to buckle under the pressure as the torture scene demonstrates ; by making him so small, he becomes more believable and more intimidating, even without the bleeding eye.

He may look like the lead singer of Franz Ferdinand in his haircut and dress sense, but Mads Mikkelson plays him brilliantly, bringing a cold, dead-eyed feel to the character which both intrigues and repulses an audience.

Creating convincing poker scenes in films is pretty difficult. The vast majority of efforts go for a highly stylised or choreographed approach, where audience expectations are pandered to through needless editing trickery; think of the final hand in The Cincinnati Kid, or the royal flush sequence in Maverick.

Casino Royale's poker scenes may be more stylised than those in, say, The Sting or Rounders, but they are still very well-executed with good pacing and a frisson of unpredictability.

What really makes them work, however, is the build-up in the script; there are little poker motifs dotted throughout, with comments about tells and misdirection.

Because the film makes such a big theme out of bluffing and people not being what they seem, the card games don't feel like isolated set-pieces, and the later developments with Mathis and Vesper feel credible and yet still surprising.

It isn't just that both characters ultimately don't make it past the final reel; the characters are both instrumental in the making of Bond, an affront and a challenge to his impulsive, playboy instincts and a safe refuge from the madness of his job and the people he has to kill.

Eva Green is every bit as gripping and electric on screen as Diana Rigg before her; Vesper goes toe-to-toe with Bond and we get genuine character development, making her betrayal and death all the more shocking and heartbreaking.

Craig's Bond is a changed man by the end of the film - it's just a pity that the resolution to his heartbreak in Quantum of Solace was as underwhelming and mishandled as the similar attempt in Diamonds Are Forever.

The heartbreak surrounding Vesper brings us onto another of Casino Royale's great successes: Desmond Llewellyn's Q may have advised Bond that he should never let his enemies see him bleed, but the best Bond films have never been afraid of putting him through the mill, getting him into dangerous situations which can only be resolved at great cost - a cost often numbed by women and alcohol.

The fight scenes in Casino Royale feel brutal, just as they should do; it isn't interesting to have someone waltz through conflict as though it was nothing.

The torture scene and the defibrillator scene are great in isolation, but they are matched by Bond's emotional torment of losing Vesper.

For the first time since Timothy Dalton's era - or Goldeneye at a push - Bond's pain feels real and meaningful. All of which brings us to Daniel Craig as Bond.

While his subsequent films have been hit-and-miss, his performance here is more than enough to silence those who criticised his casting all those 'James Blonde' jokes sound all the more desperate now.

He takes the suffering and burnt-out approach that Dalton brought and fuses it with some of Connery's unabashed cool to create a truly modern and contemporary Bond.

He also has the confidence to eschew convention as much as he chooses to reflect or inhabit it; we get a build-up to a cliched sex scene, but then he's quickly on his toes and back to the plot.

Casino Royale is a great, gripping spy thriller and arguably the finest of all the James Bond films. While it is slightly too long and a little too candid with some of its product placement, it remains an extraordinary reinvention of a franchise which had long been in need of a boost.

Craig impresses in his first and finest performance as Bond, and Martin Campbell directs with great common sense and precision to create a majestic and immensely enjoyable film.

Whether looking at the newer films or the franchise as a whole, this has set a very high bar which has yet to be beaten. With Daniel Craig reinventing the role like never before, Casino Royale reboots the Bond franchise with gusto and intelligence not seen before in the long running franchise.

Thanks to the best story of the series to date, Casino Royale features the right blend of exhilarating action and heart pounding drama.

Daniel Craig is the best Bond since Connery and for my money the best actor to play the character. The fact that the series hasn't reach the heights of this film before or since only makes it an easier decision as my all-time favorite film in the franchise.

Even casual fans can get their money's worth out of this. If you only watch one Bond film, make it this one. Daniel Craig revitalizes the Bond franchise the same way Bale saved Batman.

This was a throwback to the good ol days of Connery Bond. Almost all the the good stuff i heard about Casino is true. It is indeed one of the best Bonds ever and I'm really looking forward to the next installment.

Now - I hate when people say this but here goes - this movie was just too darn long. Don't even TRY to introduce a romance two hours into a film.

More Top Movies Trailers Forums. Season 7 Black Lightning: Season 2 DC's Legends of Tomorrow: Season 4 The Deuce: Season 2 Doctor Who: Season 11 The Flash: Season 3 Saturday Night Live: Season 4 The Walking Dead: Part of the Collection: View All Videos 1.

View All Photos James Bond's first mission takes him to Madagascar, where he is to spy on a terrorist Mollaka. Not everything goes as planned and Bond decides to investigate, independently of the MI6 agency, in order to track down the rest of the terrorist cell.

Following a lead to the Bahamas, he encounters Dimitrios and his girlfriend, Solange. He learns that Dimitrios is involved with Le Chiffre, banker to the world's terrorist organizations.

Secret Service intelligence reveals that Le Chiffre is planning to raise money in a high-stakes poker game in Montenegro at Le Casino Royale.

MI6 assigns to play against him, knowing that if Le Chiffre loses, it will destroy his organization. At first skeptical of what value Vesper can provide, Bond's interest in her deepens as they brave danger together--and even torture at the hands of Le Chiffre.

The marathon game proceeds with dirty tricks and violence, raising the stakes beyond blood money and reaching a terrifying climax.

PG for intense sequences of violent action, a scene of torture, sexual content and nudity. Daniel Craig as James Bond. Eva Green as Vesper Lynd.

Mads Mikkelsen as Le Chiffre. Judi Dench as M. Jeffrey Wright as Felix Leiter. Giancarlo Giannini as Mathis. Caterina Murino as Solange.

Simon Abkarian as Alex Dimitrios. Jesper Christensen as Mr. Ivana Milicevic as Valenka. Claudio Santamaria as Carlos.

Tobias Menzies as Villiers. Sebastien Foucan as Mollaka. Malcolm Sinclair as Dryden. Richard Sammel as Gettler.

Ludger Pistor as Mendel. Joseph Millson as Carter. Daud Shah as Fisher. Clemans Schick as Kraft. Emmanuel Avena as Leo. Tom Chadbon as Stockbroker.

Dayo Ade as Infante. Urbano Barberini as Tomelli. Madame Wu as Tsai Chin. Charlie Levi Leroy as Gallardo. Lazar Ristovski as Kaminofsky.

Season 7 Black Lightning: Season 2 DC's Legends of Tomorrow: Season 4 The Deuce: Season 2 Doctor Who: Season 11 The Flash: Season 3 Saturday Night Live: Season 4 The Walking Dead: View All Photos 5.

The inner-workings of a corrupt Las Vegas casino are exposed in Martin Scorsese's story of crime and punishment.

The film chronicles the lives and times of three characters: Ace plays by the rules albeit Vegas rules, which, as he reminds the audience in voiceover, would make him a criminal in any other state , while Nicky and Ginger lie, cheat, and steal their respective ways to the top.

The film's first hour and a half details their rise to power, while the second half follows their downfall as the FBI, corrupt government officials, and angry mob bosses pick apart their Camelot piece by piece.

R for strong brutal violence, pervasive strong language, drug use and some sexuality. Martin Scorsese , Nicholas Pileggi.

Sharon Stone as Ginger McKenna. Joe Pesci as Nicky Santoro. James Woods as Lester Diamond. Don Rickles as Billy Sherbert. Alan King as Andy Stone.

Kevin Pollak as Philip Green. Jones as Pat Webb. Dick Smothers as Senator. Frank Vincent as Frank Marino.

Erika vonTagen as Older Amy. Joe Bob Briggs as Don Ward. Pasquale Cajano as Remo Gaggi. Melissa Prophet as Jennifer Santoro. Bill Allison as John Nance.

Oscar Goodman as Himself. Phillip Suriano as Dominick Santoro. Erika Von Tagen as Older Amy. Frankie Avalon as Himself.

Philip Suriano as Dominick Santoro. Steve Allen as Himself. Jayne Meadows as Herself. Jerry Vale as Himself. Audrey Meadows as Herself.

Joseph Rigano as Vincent Borelli. Gene Ruffini as Vinny Forlano. Dominick Grieco as Americo Capelli. Richard Amalfitano as Casino Executive.

Strafella as Casino Executive. Casper Molee as Counter. David Leavitt as Counter. Peter Conti as Arthur Capp. Steve Vignari as Beeper.

Rick Crachy as Chastised Dealer. Nadler as Lucky Larry. Paul Herman as Gambler in Phone Booth. Salvatore Petrillo as Old Man Capo.

Joey de Pinto as Stabbed Gambler. Heidi Keller as Blonde at Bar. Millicent Sheridan as Senator's Hooker. Nobu Matsuhisa as Ichikawa. Toru Nagai as Ichikawa's Associate.

Barbara Spanjers as Ticket Agent. Dom Angelo as Craps Dealer. Dean Casper as Elderly Man. Joe Molinaro as Shift Manager. Bret McCormick as Bernie Blue.

Ali Pirouzkar as High Roller. Clem Caserta as Sal Fusco. Frankie Jay Allison as Craps Dealer. Jed Mills as Jack Hardy. Jeff Scott Anderson as Parking Valet.

Cameron Milzer as Secretary. Richard Riehle as Charlie Clark. Azzinaro as Little Nicky age 7. Linda Perri as Ace's Secretary. Eric Randall as Reporter at Airport.

Tetzlaff as Customs Agent. Anthony Russell as Bookie. Brian Reddy as Board Investigator. Roy Conrad as Board Investigator. Carol Wilson as Classroom Nun.

Andy Jarrell as Commissioner Bales. Joe Lacoco as Detective Bob Johnson. John Manca as Wiseguy Eddy. Tyde Kierney as Contol Board Member.

Ronald Maccone as Wiseguy Jerry. Sasha Semenoff as Orchestra Leader. Buck Stephens as Credit Clerk. Mitch Kolpan as Detective. Joseph Reidy as Winner.

Joe La Due as Signaller. Carl Ciarfalio as Tony Dogs. Fred Smith as Security Guard. Jack Orend as Baker. Sonny D'Angelo as Security Guard.

Greg Anderson as Security Guard. David Varriale as Flirting Executive. Stuart Nisbet as LA Banker. Frank Adonis as Rocky.

Joseph Bono as Moosh. Craig Vincent as Cowboy. Conte as Doctor Dan.

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Casino (3/10) Movie CLIP - In Vegas, Everybody Watches Everybody (1995) HD

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